Multitasking

Many times, most of them, we all use neologisms, or oxymorons, to refer to our daily activities.

Take a simple and clear example: Multitasking.

We hear or read this neologism, daily, in our present times.

The word refers, as I am able to understand and to interpret it, to some kind of capacity that a human being has,
canbeing her able to perform more than one task with simultaneity, through the use of a medium
a medium that we useto make ordinary, or extraordinary, things. For example, for humans to use a computer.

The compound word multitasking arises from our everyday experience. An experience we daily have with the means of production each of us use. It does not refer to something alien to our intrinsic lives, but to the perception of an activity, until now, not widely noticed.

Segonquart Stuido Desktop screen
Multitasking: An example in Delfi Ramirez's desktop

The visual metaphor of the "desktop" --- showed to us by the mean of "the screen from a computer" -- is like a simile to the physical object we
knowrefer as the classic desktop. The table, the desk, the object we have in the shop or in the office, or in our workplace.

Through a computer, we feel the sense and perception to be "from the outside". For this, We,"the observers" could
beneed a new compuond word, a neologism that refers to an activity that,so far,
weit has been
had goneunnoticed. This is :

Multitasking comes after the onset of the visual metaphor of "the desktop", and after all the perception of the it, through the peripherial screen of a computer. One
or seenrealizes that this might be true; and that, for a moment, our desktop is cluttered and messy.
However, this
Multitasking, as a fact, is nothing new. Engineers should not be concerned among. It has always been part of our daily lives.
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