A Bunch of Useful Links For This Week-end

A list of links about trends, information design and web computing that you may find of use. Have a nice week-end.
The importance and unimportance of ports

The initial reaction of many people has been that its having only one port—and a non-standard one, at that—makes the MacBook a non-starter. The re-reaction has been that while it may not be for power users, it’ll be a perfectly usable computer for lots of people.

Apple's Web?

The Pointer Events specification just became a W3C Recommendation. For those unfamiliar, it’s an intriguing attempt to unify pointer events regardless of the input device in use.

Bind and the Problem of Version Control for Designers

To my knowledge, no one has yet tried to solve the problem at the file layer; a universal wrapper to which any application can write that stores its version control in a rich metadata file.

Axiom

Using the years of service of the captains as a guide (around 140 years), assuming a captain could attain the rank at the age of 20, suggests the average lifespan of humans was, at the very least, around 160 years.

Digital native, there is no such thing

There's no such thing as winning on your own terms, and there is also no such thing as a Digital Native. If you believe there is such thing you are not one, that's for sure. And the reason there is no such thing is that "digital" is a constantly moving target, though to any given generation it seems like it isn't. There will always be a next thing that strips the gears off any mind that was raised in the previous thing.

Aesthetics

Given the extreme importance that Wittgenstein attached to the aesthetic dimension of life, it is in one sense surprising that he wrote so little on the subject.
Garry Hargberg, on the importance of a holistic and tempered vision in our common understanding of the things.

Hagberg, Garry, "Wittgenstein's Aesthetics", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2014 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.)

Read the complete essay, here.

A Naïve Place

These days, before the dawn, I am doing kind of extra-work

Non-profit work, if you dare. I am spending part of my time coding and developing a future app, which I want to represent a social place I have in mind

My idea is quite simple: One thing -- the app -- delivered via TCP/IP, allowing humans to interact between and share their own experiences

I am thinking to recover the now obsolete but essential figure of the moderator, it is planned to figure the abandoned figure of the super-admin too.
Who knows if I will succeed in to put the real values for these sub-applications

For this purpose, to make my idea alive, I am investing my time using a language that belongs to the old century. A language that was alive until the past decade

The language I am referring is named PHP, an acronym which does not stand for Personal Home Page anymore

Scripter. Even if writing programs or code, even if constructing or deconstructing, are not part of your daily life, even if you prefer to run projects or manage a business to make your daily live, it is a good and healthy habit to mantain the practice and to recover those good manners that made you to become the good person you are. A smart person has present no one gets hurt
by you, for writing a few lines of code. Scrivener

 
Below, you can see an excerpt of the future app. It's a simple interface

namespace model;

interface IDataBase
{

abstract function get($memberKey);
abstract function insert(array $memberValues);
abstract function update($idMember, array $memberValues);
abstract function delete($memberKey);

}
 
Interfaces. I do love interfaces

If you are able to figure, by the means of interfaces, that place I have in mind, you will realize why I am using on purpose PHP instead of any other modern language. The place I have in mind, is a place that was physically alive until the beggining of the past decade. A language may refer to a unique Lebensform, This app will be flavoured with a way of life of human beings. This is my honest intention. the presence of the more than 2000+ people that still, today, follow the brand all over the network. People born under punches and the new so-called millenials, too. Thus the reason to choose a language that was in its inception  focused in building personal home pages inside a unique domain 

You, dearest reader, can kill the cat around the flat, and unveil the skeleton of this future app, pointing your finger to this hyperlink

Say you will. You're welcome, again

Sympatico

(...) I kept trying to get behind the network interface, and kept being locked out, until the web came along. That was the opening I had been waiting for. All of a sudden I could write software that ran between the users. And some great things came out of it, from all of us. (...)
(..) They're nice to me, no complaints on a personal level, but when you come down to it, to them I'm a user, not a creative person. (...)
(...) I saw this when Microsoft wanted to "work with me" on RSS around the time Vista was in development. I thought they meant their code would work with mine. Eventually I realized that they wanted me to use their software and tell everyone it was wonderful. They saw me as a user. A weird kind of reporter. An unpaid PR consultant.
Dave Winer hits the nail, again. On being locked out. Here

Test Your System

Failed. We have detected that your operating system does not meet the optimal webcast specifications for listening to and/or viewing webcasts. (...)
We recommend the following operating systems: Windows 7 or Windows XP SP2, and Mac OS X 10.4. (...) Please note that users with older versions of Windows (Windows NT 4.0, Windows 98, Windows ME, Windows 95), Mac, Linux, and Unix operating systems may or may not experience difficulties listening to and/or viewing webcasts. (...) Please contact your network administrator regarding any operating system upgrades.
 
Damn it, Jane. I though we were living in the XXIst century. Aren't we yet?

Here

Why programmers are not paid in proportion to their productivity

The romantic image of an über-programmer is someone who fires up Emacs, types like a machine gun, and delivers a flawless final product from scratch.
A more accurate image would be someone who stares quietly into space for a few minutes and then says “Hmm. I think I’ve seen something like this before"
This is a cite taken from Why programmers are not paid in proportion to their productivity, a great article written in the year 2009 by John D. Cook.

Nothing You Post Actually Matters

Very few people care what you're doing, whom you're with, where you're eating, or what you just bought, and the people who do were probably right next to you when you did it.

Uh, uh. Read it here.
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